Did you know there is more than one type of pneumonia? Although pneumonia always means an infection of the lungs, there are actually many different types. Two of the most common types are viral and bacterial.

The most common type of bacterial pneumonia is called pneumococcal pneumonia.

Pneumococcal pneumonia can be serious. Symptoms can come on quickly, and can include cough, fatigue, high fever, shaking chills, and chest pain with difficulty breathing. Some symptoms can last weeks or longer.

In severe cases, pneumococcal pneumonia can lead to hospitalization. Or in some cases, even death.

Pneumococcal pneumonia is not a cold or the flu. It is a bacterial lung disease, while the flu and cold are caused by viruses.

In some cases, pneumococcal pneumonia can cause part of your lung to fill up with mucus, making it hard to breathe.

You can catch pneumococcal pneumonia through coughing or close contact. It can strike anywhere, anytime—and may hit quickly and without warning.

It’s not just old and unhealthy people who are at risk for pneumococcal pneumonia. If you are 65 or older, you may be at increased risk for pneumococcal pneumonia, even if you are otherwise healthy. That’s because as you get older, your immune system becomes less able to respond to infections.

Help protect yourself. Getting vaccinated can help prevent pneumococcal pneumonia. If you are 65 or older, ask your doctor or pharmacist if vaccination against pneumococcal pneumonia is right for you.

Here’s how it happens.

Pneumococcal pneumonia is caused by a bacteria called streptococcus pneumoniae

Pneumococcal pneumonia is caused by bacteria called Streptococcus pneumoniae

Close contact with an infected person can spread pneumococcal pneumonia
Close contact with an infected person can spread pneumococcal pneumonia

It spreads from person to person through coughing or close contact

When the bacteria reaches your lungs, it causes the air sacs to become inflamed
When the bacteria reaches your lungs, it causes the air sacs to become inflamed

When the bacteria reach the lungs, they can cause some of the air sacs to become inflamed and fill with mucus

Pneumococcal pneumonia may potentially put you in the hospital, with chest pain and breathing problems.

This can lead to chest pain, coughing, difficulty breathing, and could potentially put you in the hospital

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Help protect yourself. There's no off-season for pneumococcal pneumonia.

Pneumococcal pneumonia can strike any time of the year—rain or shine—and you can get it anywhere. In fact, it's more common to catch pneumonia, including pneumococcal pneumonia, while you're out in the community going about your everyday life than it is to catch it in a hospital or healthcare setting.

You’re at higher risk
if you’re...

65 or older

even if you’re healthy.

find out
OR

19 or older

with certain chronic conditions.

find out

Unsure about your risk?
Answer a few questions now 

True or False?
You can get pneumococcal pneumonia anywhere, anytime.
True
That’s right, you can get pneumococcal pneumonia anywhere, anytime.

That’s because it spreads from person to person through coughing or close contact. You should also know that the symptoms can hit without warning and can even put you in the hospital.

True
The truth is, you can get pneumococcal pneumonia anywhere, anytime.

That’s because it spreads from person to person through coughing or close contact. You should also know that the symptoms can hit without warning and can even put you in the hospital.

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